Height of Andy Williams

height Andy Williams

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The height of Andy Williams is …m.

1. Where did Andy Williams come from ?

Howard Andrew Williams (December 3, 1927 – September 25, 2012) was an American singer. He recorded 43 albums in his career, of which 15 have been gold-certified and 3 platinum-certified. He was also nominated for six Grammy Awards. He hosted The Andy Williams Show, a television variety show, from 1962 to 1971 along with numerous TV specials. The Andy Williams Show won three Emmy awards. The Moon River Theatre in Branson, Missouri, is named after the song for which he is best known—Johnny Mercer and Henry Mancini’s “Moon River”. He sold more than 100 million records worldwide, including more than 10 million certified units in the United States.

2. What could we know about Andy Williams besides his height ?

Williams was active in the music industry for over 70 years until his death in 2012.

3. What are the projects of Andy Williams ?

Williams was born in Wall Lake, Iowa, to Florence (nĂ©e Finley) and Jay Emerson Williams, who worked in insurance and the post office. While living in Cheviot, Ohio, Williams attended Western Hills High School in Cincinnati, Ohio. He finished high school at University High School, in West Los Angeles, because of his family’s move to California.

4. Somme collaborations with Andy Williams ?

Williams had three older brothers—Bob, Don, and Dick Williams. His first performance was in a children’s choir at the local Presbyterian church. He and his brothers formed the Williams Brothers quartet in late 1938, and they performed on radio in the Midwest, first at WHO, in Des Moines, Iowa, and later at WLS, in Chicago, and WLW, in Cincinnati.

Moving to Los Angeles in 1943, the Williams Brothers sang with Bing Crosby on his 1944 hit record “Swinging on a Star”. They appeared in four musical movies: Janie (1944), Kansas City Kitty (1944), Something in the Wind (1947) and Ladies’ Man (1947).

A persistent myth alleges that as a teenager, the future singing star dubbed the singing for Lauren Bacall’s character in the 1944 feature movie To Have and Have Not. According to authoritative sources, including Howard Hawks and Bacall herself, this was not true. Williams and some female singers were tested to dub for Bacall because of fears that she lacked the necessary vocal skills. But those fears were overshadowed by the desire to have Bacall do her own singing despite her imperfect vocal talent. This myth is refuted in Leonard Maltin’s Movie Guide in the entry for this movie.

The Williams Brothers were signed by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer to appear in Anchors Aweigh and Ziegfeld Follies (1945), but before they went before the cameras the oldest brother, Bob, was drafted into military service and the group’s contract was canceled. Kay Thompson, a former radio star who was now head of the vocal department at MGM, had a nose for talent and hired the remaining three Williams brothers to sing in her large choir on many soundtracks for MGM movies, including The Harvey Girls (1946). When Bob completed his military service, Kay hired all four brothers to sing on the soundtrack to Good News (1947).

By then, Thompson was tired of working behind the scenes at MGM, so with the four Williams boys as her backup singers and dancers, she formed a nightclub act, Kay Thompson and the Williams Brothers. They made their start in Las Vegas in 1947 and became an overnight sensation. Within a year, they were the highest-paid nightclub act in the world, breaking records wherever they appeared.

Williams revealed in his memoir Moon River and Me that he and Thompson became romantically involved while on tour despite the age difference (he was 19 and she was 38). The act broke up in 1949 but reunited for another hugely successful tour from the fall of 1951 through the summer of 1953. After that, the four brothers went their separate ways. A complete itinerary of both tours is listed on the Kay Thompson biography website.

Williams and Thompson, however, remained very close, both personally and professionally. She mentored his emergence as a solo singing star. She coached him, wrote his arrangements, and composed many songs that he recorded, including his 1958 Top 20 hit “Promise Me, Love” and, later, “Kay Thompson’s Jingle Bells” on his 1964 No. 1 The Andy Williams Christmas Album. Using her contacts in the business, Thompson helped Williams land his breakthrough television gig as a featured singer for two and a half years on Tonight Starring Steve Allen; it helped that the producer of the series, Bill Harbach, was Kay’s former aide de camp. Thompson also got Williams his breakthrough recording contract with Cadence Records, whose owner, Archie Bleyer, had gotten early career breaks because of Kay and owed her a favor. Meanwhile, Williams sang backup on many of Thompson’s recordings through the 1950s, including her Top 40 hit Eloise, based on her bestselling books about the mischievous little girl who lives at the Plaza Hotel in New York.

Thompson also served as a creative consultant and vocal arranger on Williams’s three summer replacement network television series in 1957, 1958, and 1959. In the summer of 1961, Thompson traveled with Williams and coached him throughout his starring act in a summer stock tour of the musical Pal Joey. Their personal and professional relationship finally ended in 1962, when Williams met and married Claudine Longet and Thompson moved to Rome.

Williams’s solo career began in 1953. He recorded six sides for RCA Victor’s label “X”, but none was a popular hit.

After landing a spot as a regular on Tonight Starring Steve Allen in 1954, Williams was signed to a recording contract with Cadence Records, a small label in New York, run by conductor Archie Bleyer. Williams’s third single, “Canadian Sunset”, reached No. 7 in the Top Ten in August 1956; it was followed in February 1957 by his only Billboard No. 1 hit, “Butterfly”, a cover of a Charlie Gracie record. “Butterfly” was also No. 1 for two weeks on the UK Singles Chart in May 1957. More hit records followed, including “The Hawaiian Wedding Song” (US #11), “Are You Sincere?” (US #3 in February 1958), “The Village of St. Bernadette” (US #7 in December 1959), “Lonely Street” (US #5 in September 1959), and “I Like Your Kind of Love” with Peggy Powers (US #8 in May 1957).

On December 15, 1961, Williams married Claudine Longet and signed with Columbia Records. His first album with Columbia, Danny Boy and Other Songs I Love to Sing, was a chart success, peaking at No. 19. He was then asked to sing “Moon River”, the theme from Breakfast at Tiffany’s, at the 1962 Academy Awards, where it won Best Original Song. Archie Bleyer at Cadence had previously told Williams that “Moon River” would not be a hit, but the Columbia producers encouraged Andy to record the song along with eleven other movie themes for an album. After Williams performed the song at the awards show, it became a hit. Moon River and Other Great Movie Themes then sold across the country, garnering critical acclaim and propelling Williams into stardom. The album remained on the charts for the next three years and peaked at No. 3. In 1963, Williams’s producer Robert Mersey encouraged him to record “Can’t Get Used to Losing You” as the B Side to “Days of Wine and Roses”. Williams initially did not like the pop song, preferring the Mancini tune, but “Can’t Get Used to Losing You” reached No. 2 in the US and in the UK. The album containing both songs, Days of Wine and Roses and Other TV Requests, topped the album charts at No. 1 for 16 weeks.

From 1962 to 1972, Williams was one of the most popular vocalists in the country and was signed to what was at that time the biggest recording contract in history. He was primarily an album artist, and at one time he had recorded more gold albums than any solo performer except Frank Sinatra, Johnny Mathis, and Elvis Presley. By 1973 he had earned as many as 17 gold-album awards. Among his hit albums from this period were The Andy Williams Christmas Album, Dear Heart, The Shadow of Your Smile, Love, Andy, Happy Heart, Get Together with Andy Williams, Love Story, and Love Theme from the Godfather. These recordings, along with his natural affinity for the music of the 1960s and early 1970s, combined to make him one of the premier easy-listening singers of that era.

In the UK, Williams continued to reach high chart status until 1978. The albums Dear Heart (1965), Love Andy (1967), Can’t Help Falling in Love (1970), Andy Williams Show (1970), Home Lovin’ Man (No. 1, 1971), Solitaire (1973), The Way We Were (1974) and Reflections (1978) all reached the Top 10.

Williams forged an indirect collaborative relationship with Henry Mancini, although they never recorded together. Both “Moon River” and “Days of Wine and Roses” were written by Mancini, with lyrics by Johnny Mercer. Williams sang Mancini’s “Dear Heart” at the 1965 Academy Awards and “The Sweetheart Tree” (also written with Mercer) at the 1966 Awards.

On August 5, 1966, the 14-story, 700-room Caesars Palace casino and nightclub opened in Las Vegas, Nevada, with the stage production of “Rome Swings”, in which Williams acted. He performed to a sold-out crowd in the Circus Maximus showroom. He headlined for Caesars for the next twenty years.

On September 17, 1968, Columbia released a single of two songs Williams sang at the funeral of Robert F. Kennedy, his close friend: “The Battle Hymn of the Republic” and Franz Schubert’s “Ave Maria”. These were never released on a long-playing record but have appeared in several compilations of Williams’s output.

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Height Andy Williams